Author(s)
Title
Year
Zoltán Veres2017
(6/3)
 
Aysel Oflazoglu;
 Ahmet Mercan;
 Ayla Tunçel;
 Ibrahim Göç;
 Emine Şentürk 
2017
(6/3)
Abstract: Ertuğrul Gazi Commemorating ceremony and Söğüt Festival is a great example of sustainability of culture, tourism and recognition of old traditions. It has lasted over seven centuries; the 735th anniversary was held in 2016. It is celebrated annually on the second week of September in the Söğüt district of the city of Bilecik in Turkey. This festival is celebrated with spiritual purposes such as presenting the love and respect of the nomadic ‘Yoruk’ tribes to their fathers; teaching the love of the fatherland and history to young generations; memorising their history; and enhancing unity and solidarity between them.
 
Viktória Krémer;
 Ágnes Raffay
2017
(6/3)
Keywords: museum education, interpretation, marketing communication,
Abstract: Museums have been regarded as the guardians of our heritages and in order to protect and promote their sustainability. We have to look at the ways in which they further the understanding of those heritages. We focus here on the ways museums market their education programmes. Museum education programmes have a crucial role in preserving cultural heritage, as the participation of visitors provides an opportunity for learning about historical and cultural heritage actively instead of getting information passively. Museum education sessions introduce the exhibits in context, raising attention and are designed to make the learning process enjoyable. The basic aim of these programmes is to bring museums closer to people, but the question arises how the people can be brought closer to museums. This paper investigates how and where the most visited cultural (heritage) attractions in Veszprém County, Hungary communicate these programmes towards the potential visitors.
 
Szilvia Kántor2017
(6/3)
Abstract: The Great Synagogue in Budapest plays a very important role in the cultural tourism market of the capital city because it is able to attract thousands of tourists every year. This building is not just the most impressive synagogue in Hungary, but it is the largest in Europe and the second largest in the world. In addition to this, its characteristics are excellent for different kind of musical performances or exhibitions as it gives place to numerous cultural events each year. However, besides its historical and touristic value, it also serves the needs of the locals with its numerous religious buildings and catering facilities. Budapest is the home of the largest Jewish community of Central-Europe and the majority of the Hungarian Jewish people also live in the neighbourhood of this area. So, this part of the city offers an outstanding possibility to get acquainted with the Jewish traditions and heritages. This historical part of the city was quite neglected until 2002 when it became a part of the youth tourism strategy of Budapest. At that time the formerly ruined buildings were renovated and popular summer clubs, like the Szimpla-Garden, and the Gozsdu Courtyard were moved into them. Thanks to these developments, this area offers a wide range of services for both locals and tourists. (greatsynagogue.hu) It is apparent that sustainability has a major significance in the case of the Great Synagogue and its surroundings. This research explores the whole touristic value of this area, particularly focussing on the latest development efforts that supported sustainability in the last few years. Alongside the supply side, the paper also analyzes the available comments on TripAdvisor in order to get a better overview of the consumers’ opinions and experiences. Finally, the conclusion will highlight the possible future development directions which make this area more viable and sustainable.
 
Peter Wiltshier2017
(6/3)
Abstract: The focus of this paper is the post-Fordist, post-modern approach to the development of community social capital shared in most parts with stakeholders through the focus on community well being and the role that tourism can take to enhance the wellbeing for the majority of stakeholders. This project encompasses best practice experiences from case studies conducted in a tourism ‘hot spot’ in the environs of the first National Park established in the United Kingdom. There is some urgency about this topic; resources for community development are increasingly under pressure from both local and central government, with the expectation is now that local communities take full responsibility for that development. Wellbeing needs allocation of scarce resources even more sounder the post-Fordist regime. Two case studies’ outcomes in this development are presented with a special focus on creation of a repository for the know-how and know what of the learning acquired.
 
Nikoletta Tóth‑Kaszás;
 Krisztina Keller;
 Ildikó Ernszt
2017
(6/3)
Abstract: The development of rural areas is a crucial challenge in our days. The revival of traditions and conventional jobs can be important tools for the progress of different regions and can help to attract more visitors. Showing traditional products and the life style can offer an extremely interesting, impressive experience for the visitor. Local products are also related to the matter of sustainability. Furthermore, other significant elements come also to the fore, like: local value creation, strengthening ruralties, job creation related to economic restructuring and changing attitudes. Thematic routes can contribute to the touristic exploitation of yet untapped capabilities. The primary goal of these routes are education, dissemination of knowledge, the establishment of cooperation, the protection of the environment and the traditions; or the implementation of various development projects. They are beneficial for the local community from an environmental, social and economic point of view as well. They are capable of deflecting the mass tourism; most of them call for the use of environmental-friendly modes of transport. Further the benefit is realized at the local population, and they significantly contribute to the exploration, development and preservation of local values. Furthermore, these routes strengthen social cohesion and local identity and promote the survival of traditional knowledge. In the framework of the 4 Towers Project different actions were initiated to draw attention to the work of local producers of the Hungarian–Croatian border region. Among others project partners collected local producers working in the region in one thematic route. In order to examine the acceptance and long-term sustainability of the 4 Towers thematic route an empirical research was carried out among affected local producers in the region. In present paper our aim is to determine the elements, which can contribute to the successful establishment and operation of the thematic route. Further the research has measured the willingness of local producers to cooperate, since the common initiation and unity of the local community is inevitable in order to operate thematic routes successfully.
 
Martin Zsarnoczky2017
(6/3)
Keywords: European tourism, senior tourism, silver tourism, silver economy, senior generation, tourism trends,
Abstract: The human population is showing an ageing tendency worldwide, both in developed and developing countries. ‘Silver economy’ (a term invented and often used by the EU) is expected to affect almost every segment of the whole economy in the near future. New services developed for senior people generally aim to support well-being with health monitoring, robotic assistance, electrical mobility or sport activities, including health tourism, green care and web-based home care solutions. In the European Union, the Living Lab experimental programmes implement complex developments and exemplary models focusing on solutions in connection with the ageing process. Senior tourists require personal care, attention and have special needs and preferences. The tourism sector has the potential to strengthen its sectors through development, and the innovation of existing capacities will provide an instant response to the demands of silver tourism.
 
Monica Wai Chun Choy;
 Ken Kamoche
2017
(6/3)
Abstract: This paper aims to characterize the theoretical and practical aspects of China–Africa tourism in order to help formulate policies for sustainable travel that benefits Africans while enabling Chinese to take a proactive role in changing the negative attitudes and practices, and to identify the implications of this engagement for western tour operators who see the China–Africa engagement as a threat to their own traditional interests. Both Kenya and Tanzania have now identified Asia as a growth area, in particular China (including Hong Kong and Macau), in line with the region’s (and indeed much of Africa’s) ‘Go East’ policy. This policy initiative offers new opportunities for tour operators in this Asia region. This paper thus explores the nature of this engagement, the mutual benefits it is likely to yield, and the associated challenges that currently hamper the industry. We outline the key theoretical developments pertinent to the China–Africa tourist phenomenon, outline our research methods, followed by an analysis and review of our empirical findings. The paper concludes with some insights on how this paper might contribute to further theory development and articulation of policy implications toward a better understanding of this emergent and important phenomenon.
 
Alan Clarke;
 Katalin Lőrincz
2017
(6/3)
 
Alan Clarke2017
(6/3)
Abstract: This paper introduces some very difficult concepts which are important to our ongoing discussion. It raises the questions about what sustainable development means and what sort of values are involved. This questioning of the values involved is focussed on themes coming from the management of World Heritage Sites. There are questions about how far value expressed in financial or economic terms can explain what the meanings of heritage are and how heritage can add different values to our lives.
 
Katalin Ásványi;
 Melinda Jászberényi
2017
(6/3)
Abstract: Festival tourism is a dynamically growing sector of tourism, the number of festival visitors are increasing, and the travel motivations for this reason are strengthening. The festivals use and shape their natural and social environments and they play an important role in the environmental, economic and social sustainability of their regions. Taking into account the tourism effects of festivals, it is important to interpret the issue of sustainability. Our main research questions are: How does the festival affect the lives of the local community? What does it cause in the economy of the region? How does it change the immediate environment? The research has two parts. Firstly, Hungarian festivals are analysed and evaluated on the basis of the information available on their websites. There are seven pre-determined criteria factors: 1. the quality of locals’ lives; 2. change and enlargement of employment structures; 3. change of value-system; 4. development of individual, family and social relationships; 5. expressions of creativity; 6. local community organizations; and 7. change and preservation of traditions. The second part of the research was a series of interviews, where the main criteria were the same seven ones. The aim of the study is to highlight the most important points in terms of sustainability and to present positive examples of how festivals can positively contribute to sustainability issues.
 
Katalin Lőrincz2017
(6/3)
Keywords: sustainable urban destinations, European Capital of Culture cities, residents involvement, sustainable business models, KRAFT Concept,
Abstract: This research report shifts the debate on sustainable tourism destinations from an emphasis on sustainable development and destination planning towards sustainable urban tourism destinations, especially in (Central) European Capital of Culture Cities (ECoC). Futhermore there are some practical approach as well: how to implement the best practices of previous ECoCs into Veszprem tender (competitor for ECoC 2023) and what kind of similarities can be found in the KRAFT concept usage. A quantitative online survey among students (N = 420) at University of Pannonia, Veszprem, examined the temporary (but creative target group) residents’ behaviour in four major categories related to sustainable urban destination development and residents involvement: green consumption (transport use, sustainable energy/material use, behaviour and norms); daily leisure interest and activities; information sources and perspectives about city development.
 
Jiří Vaníček, Eva Vavrečková2017
(6/3)
Abstract: The most important form of tourism in the Czech Republic is cultural tourism. Since the largest number of cultural monuments is situated in towns, it mainly involves heritage tourism. Primary destinations include urban conservation areas or zones, castles and chateaux. The second area of cultural tourism includes zoos. In terms of visitor numbers, zoos are the most visited attractions of many towns. Although folklore traditions are kept mainly in rural areas, most folklore festivals and shows take place in towns as these have the necessary infrastructure to hold them. The authors of this paper have long been engaged in this issue in theory as well as in the form of a series of specific research. The paper summarises the findings from the perspective of urban tourism.
 
Flórián Strack2017
(6/3)
Abstract: Health tourism is a dynamically developing sector of the economy with a lot of potential. Medical wellness is the cross-section of wellness tourism and medical tourism, which is continuously growing in popularity. It is a nearly new product which is expected to be one of the most popular trends in the next years but draws heavily on Hungarian traditions. This subtype of health tourism is based on both natural and man-made resources. One of the main types of services providers within health tourism are medical hotels. Issues of sustainability are very important for this segment because these accommodations are based on, and used to operate within sensitive natural resources and conditions. The paper deals with certified Hungarian medical hotels. It analyses the hotels’ present situation with the help of structured interviews carried out with medical wellness specialists and questionnaires dedicated to hotels and consumers. The paper’s goal is to put emphasis on medical wellness trends, providing solutions for regulatory and registration systems of domestic medical hotels as well as to analyse them in the context of sustainability. In the case of hotels not only the economic sustainability is important but one should pay attention on human, social and environmental contexts as well. The role of medical wellness trends is also important, because in some cases they do not support sustainability and they are able to drive customers towards a non-sustainable form of behaviour. The Hungarian system of medical wellness and medical hotels has some deficiencies and errors however these factors offer opportunities for development which will be elaborated here.
 
Eva Vavrečková, Jiří Vaníček, Radmila Dluhošová2017
(6/3)
Abstract: The Institute of Gastronomy, Spa Management and Tourism at Silesian University in Opava implements a research project Culinary Tourism and Public Gastronomy. The paper is devoted to the comparison of opinions of catering establishment managers and visitors, the first ones being professionals in this field. While some quantitative differences may be identified, they do not differ from the qualitative point of view and trends.
 
Erzsébet Péter;
 Krisztina Keller;
 Zoltán Birkner;
 Kornél Németh
2017
(6/3)
Keywords: 6_3-4_peter-keller-birkner-nemeth.pdff,
Abstract: Working people find it difficult to provide necessary rest for themselves. There are several factors forcing them to give up regeneration, even by abusing their own health. New environments generate different kinds of impulses making us forget the everyday life completely. The essence of relaxation lies in getting away from the rat race, not in idleness. This research is meant to demonstrate our changed motivations, holiday expectations and possible barriers to relaxation. The location of the empirical research is Zala County, where 508 employees were asked to fill in a questionnaire in a quantitative omnibus survey. The applicants were represented by gender. Trends in tourism have changed fundamentally in the last few years and decades, giving priority to staying young and healthy. Nowadays active tourism and seeking out new experiences have key roles. People living in the 21st century require constant improvement in all aspects of life. People tend to prefer new, undiscovered adventures to routine. The research covers the preferred aspects to decide about holidays, the ways to find leisure facilities, the changed travel patterns due to the financial crisis and the threats of terrorism, as well as factors influencing the decision-making process. In order to rise the residence time and the number of tourists, we have to offer “complex adventure packages”, which requires cooperation between ventures of different type. Each destination must strive to become a brand. They have to accomplish that both local residents and visitors have pleasant experience/image connected to the area, which makes them stay or return. One of the most effective marketing activities is turning experiences into a brand. Effective marketing tools may include a suitable Website, PR, Search Engine Optimization, leaflets, brochures, online advertisements, souvenirs and other branded products, but the major factor is the satisfied guest, which requires an appropriate organisational structure.
 
Dorottya Bodnár;
 Melinda Jászberényi;
 Katalin Ásványi
2017
(6/3)
Abstract: The paper summarizes the results of the research executed in 2016 among 15 museums and exhibitions of different size in Budapest. The research involved deep interviews with museum leaders and observation of the institutes’ exhibitions and other activities. The aspects of the research were target groups, method of interpretation, interactivity, marketing, involvement of volunteers, etc. Four important factors seem to influence visitor numbers the most, such as location, historic building of the museum itself, general attribute of the topic treated and the level of interactivity. Results were analysed in the frame of new museology, a new paradigm, in relation with museum development and operation which have to be taken into consideration by all leaders in these attractions. Museums have the responsibility of sensitization of the public regarding the importance of different topics and the value of heritage, treated among the walls. If they do not accept the methods of interpretation fitted to new generations or to anyone living in the rushing world of the 21st century, then they won’t be able to attract enough visitors for their sustainable operation and for the fulfilment of their goals. Sustainability of museums was evaluated on the basis of environmental, economic and socio-cultural points of view. Mostly all factors, analysed during the research affect one or more of the abovementioned aspects of sustainability.
 
p-ISSN 2063-8248 e-ISSN 2064-0188
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